Read about changes to CIT & LumiNUS support channels.

Page tree

Versions Compared

Key

  • This line was added.
  • This line was removed.
  • Formatting was changed.

...

Footnote Macro

Descriptions and articles about the Common Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) - Encyclopedia of Life. (n.d.). Retrieved September 14, 2015.

. It is not as common in Singapore compared to more temperate regions in its range, such as England, and is one of the eight different recognized kingfisher species that can be found in Singapore. Notably, it is known to consist of up to seven subspecies and is widely recognizable due to its blue iridescent colouration on its wings.

Figure 1: A common kingfisher perched on branch, photographed in Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur, Rajasthan, India. Given the location where the photograph was taken, as well as its crown coloration, this bird most likely belongs to the Alcedo atthis taprobana subspecies which is a resident breeder in Southern India and Sri Lanka. Credit goes to Lee Hunter for the photo

...


The Common Kingfisher generally is very territorial and has its own favorite perch from which it spots its prey in the river or pond on which it feeds
Footnote Macro

Natuhara, Y., & Imai, C. (1996). Spatial structure of avifauna along urban-rural gradients. Ecological Research, 11(1), 1–9. http://doi.org/10.1007/BF02347814

. It has a large range of diet from fishes to water beetles, as well as tadpoles and other large aquatic insects
Footnote Macro

Descriptions and articles about the Common Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) - Encyclopedia of Life. (n.d.). Retrieved September 14, 2015.

. When it has spotted prey in the water it will go from its perch, plunge into the water and emerge with its prey in its mouth which it then carries to a different perch for crushing and subsequent feeding
Footnote Macro

Tan, R. 2001. "Mangrove and wetland wildlife at Sungei Buloh Wetlands Reserve" (On-line). Accessed September 14, 2015 at http://www.naturia.per.sg/buloh/birds/Alcedo_atthis.htm.

.

The shape of the beak is very important to its feeding behavior because it is under different selective pressures compared to the beaks of other birds. For other birds, the beak morphology is mainly governed by the food it eats, as one would expect even the beak is used for feeding. However, since the Common Kingfisher needs to dive into the water to capture its prey, the beak must be such a shape that it reduces drag in the water and the amount of splash, allowing it to be faster underwater and capture its prey more successfully.

...